Sooooo…..

…..does anyone else read/reread their reviews to get PUMPED to write an update? I do…does that make me weird? Weirder, really, I’ve always known I am a peculiar child.

I’m done with AT, MJSE High, STUA, Boogeyman. Working on TOYL and WMLE. All coming soon to a FF.net near you ^_^

PS: SHOUT OUT to those that picked up my breadcrumbs and somewhat knew where I was leaning you.

halequeenbraeden:

couldthisbetrue:

 Ian and Kat Behind The Scenes of Season 6 Episode 2

Hahahaha!!! They are so in their element together. Being the close friends that they are I’m so happy they get all time of filming together. Just look at them, they’re so happy. Awww….I can’t wait to see all the new Bamon scenes!!

halequeenbraeden:

couldthisbetrue:

 Ian and Kat Behind The Scenes of Season 6 Episode 2

Hahahaha!!! They are so in their element together. Being the close friends that they are I’m so happy they get all time of filming together. Just look at them, they’re so happy. Awww….
I can’t wait to see all the new Bamon scenes!!

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah
Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )
As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.
There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.
I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.
Behance
Facebook
Zoom Info

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Extraordinary Biro Pen Art of Enham Bosakah

Enham Lives and works in Ghana ( Africa )

As I grew older, I had to fulfill the dream within me which was producing art. I went to the University, studied art, got my degree and decided to have a feel of the reality on the field of practice before I plunged into a Masters of Fine Arts degree. I eventually got disappointed going in with so much energy and optimism but with no funds. But then, I had a pen and paper, a perfect media, I thought. That was how it all begun. And I am doing very well now.

There is no name for the style of drawing I do. There are a lot of lines and minute squares. I have not named my style as I will always change it, I didn’t want to keep to one confinement. It’s a freestyle.

I work in the evening, late in the night where I can draw without interruption. I can come back to a painting after a long time, unless I am commissioned to do a piece for a client. I do what I feel like doing at what time. But roughly, it takes about 3-4 days to make a piece.

Behance

Facebook

kenobi-wan-obi:

"Race doesn’t matter!" , "Isn’t science just science?! why bring race into it!!", "It is not about the colour of skin!" meanwhile in the real world:
Is There a Bias Against Black Scientists? Funding Sparse for Minority Researchers

Black researchers and other minorities face nearly insurmountable barriers against career success, according to new research.
A February 2014 article in the Journal of Career Development details the work experiences of minority researchers in the social sciences.
Rebecca R. Kameny of the 3-C Institute for Social Development in North Carolina, directed the study, which collected data from people of color who attended a workshop on the topic of career barriers.
An astounding 72 percent of participants reported encountering workplace barriers due to their race or ethnicity.
Racism: A Sad History
Bias against minority researchers is not a new subject. In 2011, Donna K. Ginthner and her associates published a study about the NIH and grants to minority researchers. (The NIH, or National Institute of Health, is a government agency that serves as one of the prime supporters of scientific research.)
The Ginther study examined the rates at which grants were given to 83,000 researchers. Unfortunately, they found that the funding agency is biased against African Americans who submitted grant applications. According to the study, blacks are 13% less likely than equally-qualified white candidates to receive funding that is initiated by an NIH investigator.
The study’s writers explained that the researchers’ race is not always written on the application, but the applications’ reviewers could infer race from the applicants’ names and places of study. Without receiving federal funding, a researcher is less likely to receive a teaching position, less likely to be given tenure, and has more difficulty procuring funding to produce research and publish in scholarly journals. Ultimately, the repercussions of grant refusal are reflected in the face of academia.
When the study was published, the director of the NIH noted that the data is troubling and the situation is unacceptable. The NIH launched a $500 million, 10-year program to support young minorities in science. It is also considering changing its review process to review grant proposals anonymously to prevent this issue in the future.
Bias Against Blacks: Misinterpreted Data?
A 2013 study published in the Journal of Informetrics, however, contradicts the premise of bias against black researchers. The study, led by Jiansheng Yang of Virginia Tech, paints a different picture, concluding that the NIH review process contains no inherent racial bias.
Yang and his associates reviewed the work of 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at U.S. medical schools. They assessed the scientists’ productivity, based on the number of publications they wrote, their role on each paper, and the prominence of the journals in which they published. Overall, Wang’s team found that the black faculty members were less productive than their white colleagues.
The researchers then reviewed the work of 11 of those black researchers and 11 of those white researchers who had received NIH funding. When they compared blacks and whites who had the same level of productivity, they found that people of both races received the same level of NIH funding. Wang concluded that funding is determined by level of success, and not by race.
Not Apples to Apples
Ginther, who found ample evidence of the NIH’s racial bias, argued in Science that Wang did not study the same aspects of the process that she did, so he cannot refute her claim. She noted that Wang’s study examined only a small number of researchers, and also looked only at how much funding they received, instead of whether they had a chance of receiving funding in the first place.
Ginther also noted that the black scientists’ lower level of productivity pointed to their difficulty in receiving positive mentoring, which is a further function of bias.
Discrimination is Not Dead
It seems that a majority of African Americans would agree with Ginther’s point about bias. A 2013 Pew Research study about discrimination in America found that a full 88% of blacks reported that there is discrimination against blacks. 46 % believe that there is a lot of discrimination, and the rest report feeling some discrimination.
Interestingly, white Americans agree that blacks are discriminated against, but to a lesser degree. Only 16% of whites feel that there is a lot of discrimination, but 41% sense some discrimination.
Regardless of percentages and perceptions, race-based barriers to success have no place in academia or the workplace.
Zoom Info
kenobi-wan-obi:

"Race doesn’t matter!" , "Isn’t science just science?! why bring race into it!!", "It is not about the colour of skin!" meanwhile in the real world:
Is There a Bias Against Black Scientists? Funding Sparse for Minority Researchers

Black researchers and other minorities face nearly insurmountable barriers against career success, according to new research.
A February 2014 article in the Journal of Career Development details the work experiences of minority researchers in the social sciences.
Rebecca R. Kameny of the 3-C Institute for Social Development in North Carolina, directed the study, which collected data from people of color who attended a workshop on the topic of career barriers.
An astounding 72 percent of participants reported encountering workplace barriers due to their race or ethnicity.
Racism: A Sad History
Bias against minority researchers is not a new subject. In 2011, Donna K. Ginthner and her associates published a study about the NIH and grants to minority researchers. (The NIH, or National Institute of Health, is a government agency that serves as one of the prime supporters of scientific research.)
The Ginther study examined the rates at which grants were given to 83,000 researchers. Unfortunately, they found that the funding agency is biased against African Americans who submitted grant applications. According to the study, blacks are 13% less likely than equally-qualified white candidates to receive funding that is initiated by an NIH investigator.
The study’s writers explained that the researchers’ race is not always written on the application, but the applications’ reviewers could infer race from the applicants’ names and places of study. Without receiving federal funding, a researcher is less likely to receive a teaching position, less likely to be given tenure, and has more difficulty procuring funding to produce research and publish in scholarly journals. Ultimately, the repercussions of grant refusal are reflected in the face of academia.
When the study was published, the director of the NIH noted that the data is troubling and the situation is unacceptable. The NIH launched a $500 million, 10-year program to support young minorities in science. It is also considering changing its review process to review grant proposals anonymously to prevent this issue in the future.
Bias Against Blacks: Misinterpreted Data?
A 2013 study published in the Journal of Informetrics, however, contradicts the premise of bias against black researchers. The study, led by Jiansheng Yang of Virginia Tech, paints a different picture, concluding that the NIH review process contains no inherent racial bias.
Yang and his associates reviewed the work of 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at U.S. medical schools. They assessed the scientists’ productivity, based on the number of publications they wrote, their role on each paper, and the prominence of the journals in which they published. Overall, Wang’s team found that the black faculty members were less productive than their white colleagues.
The researchers then reviewed the work of 11 of those black researchers and 11 of those white researchers who had received NIH funding. When they compared blacks and whites who had the same level of productivity, they found that people of both races received the same level of NIH funding. Wang concluded that funding is determined by level of success, and not by race.
Not Apples to Apples
Ginther, who found ample evidence of the NIH’s racial bias, argued in Science that Wang did not study the same aspects of the process that she did, so he cannot refute her claim. She noted that Wang’s study examined only a small number of researchers, and also looked only at how much funding they received, instead of whether they had a chance of receiving funding in the first place.
Ginther also noted that the black scientists’ lower level of productivity pointed to their difficulty in receiving positive mentoring, which is a further function of bias.
Discrimination is Not Dead
It seems that a majority of African Americans would agree with Ginther’s point about bias. A 2013 Pew Research study about discrimination in America found that a full 88% of blacks reported that there is discrimination against blacks. 46 % believe that there is a lot of discrimination, and the rest report feeling some discrimination.
Interestingly, white Americans agree that blacks are discriminated against, but to a lesser degree. Only 16% of whites feel that there is a lot of discrimination, but 41% sense some discrimination.
Regardless of percentages and perceptions, race-based barriers to success have no place in academia or the workplace.
Zoom Info
kenobi-wan-obi:

"Race doesn’t matter!" , "Isn’t science just science?! why bring race into it!!", "It is not about the colour of skin!" meanwhile in the real world:
Is There a Bias Against Black Scientists? Funding Sparse for Minority Researchers

Black researchers and other minorities face nearly insurmountable barriers against career success, according to new research.
A February 2014 article in the Journal of Career Development details the work experiences of minority researchers in the social sciences.
Rebecca R. Kameny of the 3-C Institute for Social Development in North Carolina, directed the study, which collected data from people of color who attended a workshop on the topic of career barriers.
An astounding 72 percent of participants reported encountering workplace barriers due to their race or ethnicity.
Racism: A Sad History
Bias against minority researchers is not a new subject. In 2011, Donna K. Ginthner and her associates published a study about the NIH and grants to minority researchers. (The NIH, or National Institute of Health, is a government agency that serves as one of the prime supporters of scientific research.)
The Ginther study examined the rates at which grants were given to 83,000 researchers. Unfortunately, they found that the funding agency is biased against African Americans who submitted grant applications. According to the study, blacks are 13% less likely than equally-qualified white candidates to receive funding that is initiated by an NIH investigator.
The study’s writers explained that the researchers’ race is not always written on the application, but the applications’ reviewers could infer race from the applicants’ names and places of study. Without receiving federal funding, a researcher is less likely to receive a teaching position, less likely to be given tenure, and has more difficulty procuring funding to produce research and publish in scholarly journals. Ultimately, the repercussions of grant refusal are reflected in the face of academia.
When the study was published, the director of the NIH noted that the data is troubling and the situation is unacceptable. The NIH launched a $500 million, 10-year program to support young minorities in science. It is also considering changing its review process to review grant proposals anonymously to prevent this issue in the future.
Bias Against Blacks: Misinterpreted Data?
A 2013 study published in the Journal of Informetrics, however, contradicts the premise of bias against black researchers. The study, led by Jiansheng Yang of Virginia Tech, paints a different picture, concluding that the NIH review process contains no inherent racial bias.
Yang and his associates reviewed the work of 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at U.S. medical schools. They assessed the scientists’ productivity, based on the number of publications they wrote, their role on each paper, and the prominence of the journals in which they published. Overall, Wang’s team found that the black faculty members were less productive than their white colleagues.
The researchers then reviewed the work of 11 of those black researchers and 11 of those white researchers who had received NIH funding. When they compared blacks and whites who had the same level of productivity, they found that people of both races received the same level of NIH funding. Wang concluded that funding is determined by level of success, and not by race.
Not Apples to Apples
Ginther, who found ample evidence of the NIH’s racial bias, argued in Science that Wang did not study the same aspects of the process that she did, so he cannot refute her claim. She noted that Wang’s study examined only a small number of researchers, and also looked only at how much funding they received, instead of whether they had a chance of receiving funding in the first place.
Ginther also noted that the black scientists’ lower level of productivity pointed to their difficulty in receiving positive mentoring, which is a further function of bias.
Discrimination is Not Dead
It seems that a majority of African Americans would agree with Ginther’s point about bias. A 2013 Pew Research study about discrimination in America found that a full 88% of blacks reported that there is discrimination against blacks. 46 % believe that there is a lot of discrimination, and the rest report feeling some discrimination.
Interestingly, white Americans agree that blacks are discriminated against, but to a lesser degree. Only 16% of whites feel that there is a lot of discrimination, but 41% sense some discrimination.
Regardless of percentages and perceptions, race-based barriers to success have no place in academia or the workplace.
Zoom Info
kenobi-wan-obi:

"Race doesn’t matter!" , "Isn’t science just science?! why bring race into it!!", "It is not about the colour of skin!" meanwhile in the real world:
Is There a Bias Against Black Scientists? Funding Sparse for Minority Researchers

Black researchers and other minorities face nearly insurmountable barriers against career success, according to new research.
A February 2014 article in the Journal of Career Development details the work experiences of minority researchers in the social sciences.
Rebecca R. Kameny of the 3-C Institute for Social Development in North Carolina, directed the study, which collected data from people of color who attended a workshop on the topic of career barriers.
An astounding 72 percent of participants reported encountering workplace barriers due to their race or ethnicity.
Racism: A Sad History
Bias against minority researchers is not a new subject. In 2011, Donna K. Ginthner and her associates published a study about the NIH and grants to minority researchers. (The NIH, or National Institute of Health, is a government agency that serves as one of the prime supporters of scientific research.)
The Ginther study examined the rates at which grants were given to 83,000 researchers. Unfortunately, they found that the funding agency is biased against African Americans who submitted grant applications. According to the study, blacks are 13% less likely than equally-qualified white candidates to receive funding that is initiated by an NIH investigator.
The study’s writers explained that the researchers’ race is not always written on the application, but the applications’ reviewers could infer race from the applicants’ names and places of study. Without receiving federal funding, a researcher is less likely to receive a teaching position, less likely to be given tenure, and has more difficulty procuring funding to produce research and publish in scholarly journals. Ultimately, the repercussions of grant refusal are reflected in the face of academia.
When the study was published, the director of the NIH noted that the data is troubling and the situation is unacceptable. The NIH launched a $500 million, 10-year program to support young minorities in science. It is also considering changing its review process to review grant proposals anonymously to prevent this issue in the future.
Bias Against Blacks: Misinterpreted Data?
A 2013 study published in the Journal of Informetrics, however, contradicts the premise of bias against black researchers. The study, led by Jiansheng Yang of Virginia Tech, paints a different picture, concluding that the NIH review process contains no inherent racial bias.
Yang and his associates reviewed the work of 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at U.S. medical schools. They assessed the scientists’ productivity, based on the number of publications they wrote, their role on each paper, and the prominence of the journals in which they published. Overall, Wang’s team found that the black faculty members were less productive than their white colleagues.
The researchers then reviewed the work of 11 of those black researchers and 11 of those white researchers who had received NIH funding. When they compared blacks and whites who had the same level of productivity, they found that people of both races received the same level of NIH funding. Wang concluded that funding is determined by level of success, and not by race.
Not Apples to Apples
Ginther, who found ample evidence of the NIH’s racial bias, argued in Science that Wang did not study the same aspects of the process that she did, so he cannot refute her claim. She noted that Wang’s study examined only a small number of researchers, and also looked only at how much funding they received, instead of whether they had a chance of receiving funding in the first place.
Ginther also noted that the black scientists’ lower level of productivity pointed to their difficulty in receiving positive mentoring, which is a further function of bias.
Discrimination is Not Dead
It seems that a majority of African Americans would agree with Ginther’s point about bias. A 2013 Pew Research study about discrimination in America found that a full 88% of blacks reported that there is discrimination against blacks. 46 % believe that there is a lot of discrimination, and the rest report feeling some discrimination.
Interestingly, white Americans agree that blacks are discriminated against, but to a lesser degree. Only 16% of whites feel that there is a lot of discrimination, but 41% sense some discrimination.
Regardless of percentages and perceptions, race-based barriers to success have no place in academia or the workplace.
Zoom Info

kenobi-wan-obi:

"Race doesn’t matter!" , "Isn’t science just science?! why bring race into it!!", "It is not about the colour of skin!" meanwhile in the real world:

Is There a Bias Against Black Scientists? Funding Sparse for Minority Researchers

Black researchers and other minorities face nearly insurmountable barriers against career success, according to new research.

A February 2014 article in the Journal of Career Development details the work experiences of minority researchers in the social sciences.

Rebecca R. Kameny of the 3-C Institute for Social Development in North Carolina, directed the study, which collected data from people of color who attended a workshop on the topic of career barriers.

An astounding 72 percent of participants reported encountering workplace barriers due to their race or ethnicity.

Racism: A Sad History

Bias against minority researchers is not a new subject. In 2011, Donna K. Ginthner and her associates published a study about the NIH and grants to minority researchers. (The NIH, or National Institute of Health, is a government agency that serves as one of the prime supporters of scientific research.)

The Ginther study examined the rates at which grants were given to 83,000 researchers. Unfortunately, they found that the funding agency is biased against African Americans who submitted grant applications. According to the study, blacks are 13% less likely than equally-qualified white candidates to receive funding that is initiated by an NIH investigator.

The study’s writers explained that the researchers’ race is not always written on the application, but the applications’ reviewers could infer race from the applicants’ names and places of study. Without receiving federal funding, a researcher is less likely to receive a teaching position, less likely to be given tenure, and has more difficulty procuring funding to produce research and publish in scholarly journals. Ultimately, the repercussions of grant refusal are reflected in the face of academia.

When the study was published, the director of the NIH noted that the data is troubling and the situation is unacceptable. The NIH launched a $500 million, 10-year program to support young minorities in science. It is also considering changing its review process to review grant proposals anonymously to prevent this issue in the future.

Bias Against Blacks: Misinterpreted Data?

A 2013 study published in the Journal of Informetrics, however, contradicts the premise of bias against black researchers. The study, led by Jiansheng Yang of Virginia Tech, paints a different picture, concluding that the NIH review process contains no inherent racial bias.

Yang and his associates reviewed the work of 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at U.S. medical schools. They assessed the scientists’ productivity, based on the number of publications they wrote, their role on each paper, and the prominence of the journals in which they published. Overall, Wang’s team found that the black faculty members were less productive than their white colleagues.

The researchers then reviewed the work of 11 of those black researchers and 11 of those white researchers who had received NIH funding. When they compared blacks and whites who had the same level of productivity, they found that people of both races received the same level of NIH funding. Wang concluded that funding is determined by level of success, and not by race.

Not Apples to Apples

Ginther, who found ample evidence of the NIH’s racial bias, argued in Science that Wang did not study the same aspects of the process that she did, so he cannot refute her claim. She noted that Wang’s study examined only a small number of researchers, and also looked only at how much funding they received, instead of whether they had a chance of receiving funding in the first place.

Ginther also noted that the black scientists’ lower level of productivity pointed to their difficulty in receiving positive mentoring, which is a further function of bias.

Discrimination is Not Dead

It seems that a majority of African Americans would agree with Ginther’s point about bias. A 2013 Pew Research study about discrimination in America found that a full 88% of blacks reported that there is discrimination against blacks. 46 % believe that there is a lot of discrimination, and the rest report feeling some discrimination.

Interestingly, white Americans agree that blacks are discriminated against, but to a lesser degree. Only 16% of whites feel that there is a lot of discrimination, but 41% sense some discrimination.

Regardless of percentages and perceptions, race-based barriers to success have no place in academia or the workplace.